Friday, June 22, 2018

Workshop Worksheets


Here are the worksheets from our Workshop Thursday, for those of you who wanted to re-do the process for this paper or papers in other classes. I've included reminders of some of the extra instructions and suggestions I provided in real time over the course of the workshop to help guide you through the process as well. I hope this is useful! Have a great weekend everybody, d

Final Paper/Close Argumentative Reading Workshop Worksheet

Your Name: 

__________________________________________________________________________________________

The Text You Are Reading Closely in Your Argument: 

__________________________________________________________________________________________
BRAINSTORM! Take 20 mins. or so to write down 20-30 claims about your chosen text. Don't worry whether these claims are "deep," just write down claims you think are true and interesting about the text and be as clear and specific as you can.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.

23.

24.
Continue on the back of the page if you like. The more claims you have to work with, the better.

Final Paper/Close Argumentative Reading Workshop Worksheet (PART TWO: In Class)

Your Name: 
__________________________________________________________________________________________

The Text You Are Reading Closely in Your Argument: 

_______________________________________________________
I. In groups of three: Discuss your BRAINSTORM and then PICK THE THREE BEST THESIS CANDIDATE CLAIMS and write them down in their best, clearest form here (Twenty-Four Minutes)


1.

2.

3.

{Added: from my in-class instructions and notes:


A Focus on the claims you take most seriously, but don't be afraid to mention silly ones others may help you see the potential of.

B Determine which, if any, of your claims are not really about the text at all, but your opinions about the world and lead you to argue with the text rather than about the text.
C Eliminate claims that say the text is "good," "correct," "effective" -- or claims "wrong," "incorrect," or "ineffective" since these are really claims about your feelings and don't require arguments. Sometimes a real claim is embedded in
these assessments if you can answer specifically WHY you find something "effective" or not.}


II. Now on your own, for each of your three thesis candidate claims COME UP WITH THE STRONGEST OR MOST OBVIOUS OPPOSITION TO EACH THESIS (Ten Minutes):

1.

2.

3.

{Added: from my in-class instructions and notes: 
For example, what would the opposite claim be to the one you are making? Or, might there be an element or detail in the text that initially seems to contradict the thrust of your claim?}



III. In NEW groups of three: Discuss your thesis candidates and their OPPOSITIONS and write down the results, reconsiderations, and re-edits here (Twenty-Four Minutes):

1.

2.

3.


{Added: from my in-class instructions and notes:   

Can you imagine anyone actually making these oppositional claims about the text you have read? Be honest with each other about this, it is important.
            If the opposition you have come up with seems vague or unintelligent or highly implausible this probably indicates that you need to sharpen up your own initial thesis. Is there a version of your thesis that is more focused and specific that retains the spirit of your claim but which provokes a more interesting opposition? What is it? What is its opposition?
            If, on the contrary, the opposition you have written suddenly seems more compelling than the thesis itself this probably indicates that the stakes of your project, or possibly your whole take on the text itself, is different than you initially thought it was. Perhaps what you thought of as opposition to your thesis actually provides you with a stronger thesis and a new direction for your own paper. What is the strongest or most opposition to the new thesis you have adopted?
}


IV. On your own, pick the strongest thesis and its best opposition and write them down in the template below (Five Minutes):

V. In NEW groups of three discuss your text, thesis, opposition, and textual moments that may support the thesis or provide a means to circumvent its objection. Also, determine whether any key terms need definitions (Thirty-Six Minutes):

{Added: from my in-class instructions and notes:  

Help one another identify two key details or elements in the text to which you could direct a reader's attention in an effort to support your individual theses, and also one detail or element you might use to circumvent its opposition. Also, if there are terms that seem to be especially central to a colleague's arguments or are being used in an idiosyncratic or technical way, determine whether they need to be defined and how.}


Thesis:

1. (textual support)


2. (textual support)


3. (textual support)


Opposition:

(textual circumvention)


Terms requiring definition?